1801 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Sir James Bland Burges

Anonymous, "Domestic occurrences: The Literary Fund" Gentleman's Magazine 71 (May 1801) 476.



The Anniversary of the Society for the establishment of a Literary Fund was also this day celebrated at Freemasons-hall; and the friends of genius and learning, and all their important effects on the prosperity and happiness of the country, will rejoice, that it is annually making great accessions of strength and power. The Stewards had provided for 500; they made room for 325, and considerable numbers were obliged to return unaccommodated.

Sir James Bland Burges, Bart. one of the Vice-Presidents, was in the Chair; and, by appropriate toasts, songs, and musick, and particularly by the introduction of poems on the occasion, the whole formed an entertainment peculiar in its kind as it is noble in its object. The Chair was honourably supported by the Duke of Somerset, Sir William Clayton, Sir John Cox Hippesley, Thomas Williams, Esq, M.P. Richard J. Sullivan, Esq. John Symmons, Esq. William Salte, Esq. Mr. Drummond, the late Charge d'Affaires at Denmark, and several other persons eminent in rank as well as literature; and we have great satisfaction in saying, that this most beneficent Institution has, by the warm and liberal countenance with which it has been taken up, already acquired a firm and permanent establishment. The fund is now very considerable; and it is most faithfully administered. Relief is given to authors and their families depressed by age, indisposition, or penury, with the most delicate regard to their feelings; and the Institution is almost entirely managed without expence, as the Council and Committee transact the whole of the business gratuitously.