1809 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

William Gifford

Lord Byron, in English Bards and Scotch Reviewers (1809); Poetical Works, ed. E. H. Coleridge (1898-1904) 1:363 & n.



"Why slumbers GIFFORD?" once was asked in vain;
Why slumbers GIFFORD? let us ask again.
Are there no follies for his pen to purge?
Are there no fools whose backs demand the scourge?
Are there no sins for Satire's Bard to greet?
Stalks not gigantic Vice in every street?
Shall Peers or Princes tread pollution's path,
And 'scape alike the Laws and Muse's wrath?
Nor blaze with guilty glare through future time,
Eternal beacons of consummate crime?
Arouse thee, GIFFORD! be thy promise claimed,
Make bad men better, or at least ashamed.

Mr. GIFFORD promised publicly that the Baviad and Maeviad should not be his last original works: let him remember, "Mox in reluctantes dracones."