1829 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

John Pinkerton

Walter Scott, in Quarterly Review (July 1829) 131, 135; Allibone, Critical Dictionary of English Literature (1858-71; 1882) 2:1599.



The pugnacious John Pinkerton. He was a man of an eager, acute, tenacious temper; a devourer of learning — a very helluo librorum... He entertained or affected great respect for, and acquaintance with, the works of foreign literati; and, assuming an enthusiasm for their learning, indulged his own arrogance by employing their uncivil language, and translating the classical vituperation of menteris, impudentissime, into the St. Giles dialect of "you lie, scoundrel."... His studious and laborious disposition deserves praise; and the defects we have had to notice with pain, arose in youth from mortification at the failure of a long series of literary attempts — some of which merited another fate.