1817 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

George Colman the Younger

Anonymous, in Blackwood's Magazine 1 (1817) 417.



Mr. Colman's poetical productions are chiefly remarkable for two things: in the first place, one-half of his verses are without any meaning whatever; and to make up for this, he contrives, in the second place, to endow the other half with what the French call double meanings, — that is, licentious, vulgar, and disgusting ideas, disguised (in Mr. C's case, very slightly) under equivocal or ambiguous terms. In justice to Mr. Colman's taste, we must add, that there is sometimes a third part of unpalliated grossness.