1809 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Samuel Rogers

Lord Byron, in English Bards and Scotch Reviewers (1809); Poetical Works, ed. E. H. Coleridge (1898-1904) 1:361-62 &n.



Come forth, oh CAMPBELL! give thy talents scope;
Who dares aspire if thou must cease to hope?
And thou, melodious ROGERS! rise at last,
Recall the pleasing memory of the past.
Arise! let blest remembrance still inspire,
And strike to wonted tones thy hallowed lyre;
Restore Apollo to his vacant throne,
Assert thy country's honour and thine own.

It would be superfluous to recall to the mind of the reader the authors of the Pleasures of Memory and The Pleasures of Hope, the most beautiful didactic poems in our language, if we except Pope's Essay on Man; but so many poetasters have started up, that even the names of Campbell and Rogers are become strange.