1617 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Thomas Dekker

William Fennor, in The Compter's Commonwealth (1617); Moulton, Library of Literary Criticism (1901-05) 2:58-59.



Why, sir, sayd I, there is a booke called Greene's Ghost haunts Conycatchers; another called Legerdemaine, and The Blacke Dog of Newgate; but the most wittiest, elegantist and eloquentest peece (Master Dekkers, the true heire of Appolo composed) called The Bell-man of London, have already set foorth the vices of the time so vively, that it is unpossible the Anchor of any other mans braine can sound the sea of a more deepe and dreadful mischeefe.