1808 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Robert Southey

Walter Scott to George Ellis, 15 December 1808; Lockhart, Life of Scott (1837-38; 1902) 2:102-03.



Jeffrey has offered terms of pacification, engaging that no party politics should again appear in his [Edinburgh] Review. I told him I thought it was now too late, and reminded him that I had often pointed out to him the consequences of letting his work become a party tool. He said "he did not fear the consequences — there were but four men he feared as opponents." — "Who were these?" — "Yourself, for one." — "Certainly you pay me a great compliment; depend upon it I will endeavor to deserve it." — "Why, you would not join against me?" — "Yes I would, if I saw a proper opportunity: not against you personally, but against your politics." — "You are privileged to be violent." — "I don't ask any privilege for undue violence. But who are your other foemen?" — "George Ellis and Southey." The fourth he did not name.