1808 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Thomas Dermody

Anonymous, in Review of Dermody, The Harp of Erin; The Cabinet 3 (April 1808) 255.



As a poet he is above Savage and below Chatterton, both of whom he so much resembled in his life and manners. He had no great portion of that true creative genius which marks the real poet, but he had a wonderful memory which never lost what it had once stored up; and he had the talent, with a remarkable faculty of versification, of pouring out these acquired treasures at will, and of so skillfully combining them as to give them the appearance of originality. His choice of words was ample, and felicitous in the highest degree, and though sometimes wild and extravagant in his sentiments, he never sunk into flatness and insipidity.