1885 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

James Kirke Paulding

James Grant Wilson, in Bryant and His Friends (1885) 129.



Paulding was a man of great intellectual robustness: strong in his convictions, and inexorable in his prejudices; with great clearness of perception, but little inclination to the ideal; ... rejoicing in sarcasm, though free from malignity both in his books and in his conversation; never yielding to the illusion of fancy or feeling, and expressing himself in a language more remarkable for its grave irony and blunt vigour than for its amenity or elegance. No man ever stood up more stoutly or manfully in defence of that "mother of a mighty race," when she was assailed from abroad, than James K. Paulding; nor did any man ever born on American soil entertain greater contempt for foreign example or criticism.