1829 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Bp. Reginald Heber

Robert Southey to C. W. W. Wynn, 28 October 1829; Selection from the Letters, ed. Warter (1856) 4:154-55.



The epitaph upon Reginald Heber was lengthened, and of course injured, at Mrs. Heber's desire. You know that I wished it to have been in verse, and have in consequence promised something in verse for the forthcoming volumes of his Correspondence, &c. I saw more of him at Llangedwynn than elsewhere. The first time we met was at this brother's at Pimlico, where I breakfasted for the purpose of meeting him. Inglis, to whom I had been introduced the day before at Longman's, was of the party. The last time I saw him was at Charles Warren's, whose wife is a very old acquaintance of mine. Both volumes of "Sermons" Mr. H. has sent me, and I have read them with great pleasure. But how could the Bishop (Kay?) who delivered the valedictory address, assert that he had abandoned human learning and renounced the prospect of literary fame? This was not true, and if it had been true would not have been meritorious.