1838 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Bp. Reginald Heber

Robert Aris Willmott, in Sacred Poets, Second Series (1838; 1853) 334.



At Neasdon, Heber was more distinguished by the elegance of his exercises than by the rapidity of his acquirements. He had already begun to cultivate the study of the elder poets, and especially of that writer who delighted the youthful heart of Milton, and awoke the fancy of Cowley, and breathed his beautiful notes into the ear of Pope. The Faery Queen of Spenser was his constant companion during those solitary rambles which he preferred to the boisterous amusements of his school-fellows; and we are informed that mature experience did not impair his love of that exquisite poem, for he seldom travelled without a volume of his school copy to read on the road.