1875 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Allan Cunningham

David Hogg, in Life of Allan Cunningham (1875) 373.



As a writer his fancy was perhaps a little too luxuriant — he loved nature in her wildest tangles, and to have trimmed the wild-rose bush, or the hawthorn tree, would have been in his sight vandalism which he could not endure. While to the trained critic of modern literature there may appear in his works too great an exuberance of imagination, and too strong a fragrance of flowers, we are much mistaken if these are not the very things that will embalm his memory in the minds of those whom he sought most to please, the peasantry of his native land. We now reverentially let fall the curtain, and would inscribe upon the monolith which covers his grave — "Honest Allan — a credit to Caledonia!"