1828 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Lord Byron

Leigh Hunt, in Lord Byron and some of his Contemporaries (1828) 1:77-78.



Spenser he could not read; at least he said so. All the gusto of that most poetical of the poets went with him for nothing. I lent him a volume of the Fairy Queen, and he said he would try to like it. Next day he brought it to my study-window, and said, "Here, Hunt, here is your Spenser. I cannot see any thing in him:" and he seemed anxious that I should take it out of his hands, as if he was afraid of being accused of copying so poor a writer. That he saw nothing in Spenser is not very likely; but I really do not think that he saw much. Spenser was too much out of the world, and he too much in it.