1849 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Fitz-Greene Halleck

Joseph C. Cogswell to Fitz-Greene Halleck, 15 June 1849; Life and Letters of Halleck, ed. Wilson (1869) 273.



My Dear Halleck:

I must send you a line to report to you the substance of a delightful conversation I had with Rogers about you last week. He asked Lady Davy, at one of his breakfasts, if she had read your poems; she answered no. "Shame on you," said he; "he has written some things which no poet living has surpassed, and you shall not be ignorant of him any longer." The book was brought, and Rogers read in his best manner several passages from Alnwick Castle, the greater part of Marco Bozzaris, and a few of the shorter pieces. He then laid down the volume and entertained us with a beautiful tribute to your merit as a poet.