1864 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Fitz-Greene Halleck

Nathaniel Parker Willis, in "Letters from Idlewild" Home Journal (June 1864); Moulton, Library of Literary Criticism (1901-05) 6:494.



With such advantages of physiognomy and manners, so winning a look and voice, how is it that Fitz-Greene Halleck has never let himself be known to audiences? With his well-won fame as the poet whom everybody is ready to admire, he retires to Connecticut, coming to New York only as the most retiring of visitors to the most secluded of hotels — thus "biding his time," while hundreds upon hundreds of those who appreciate and fervently admire him do not even know him by sight! Halleck's genial countenance, and, still more, his full and genial cadences of voice, suited him especially for a lecturer. What a pity that so admirably-formed a creature should die (as he is likely to!) without the eye-and-ear homage for which Nature gifted him!