1830 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

William Kennedy

Anonymous, in Edinburgh Literary Journal (23 October 1830) 253.



Of all the books of metre that have been published within the last ten years, how many, think you, are destined to live? — how many are remembered and spoken of even at the present moment? We want some poet to "rouse us with a rattling peal of thunder," — some bard who will be "bloody, bold, and resolute." Kennedy has not done this yet, but the lightning sleeps in him, and already coruscates round him. Nobody could peruse his Fitful Fancies without seeing at once that he was a man to take an interest in, and that in all probability each successive work he brought forth would add to his popularity. There is no flummery about him. He is full of strong feelings and good conceptions. He thinks boldly, and, what is much better, he thinks sincerely.