1830 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Thomas Babington Macaulay

John Wilson, in Blackwood's Magazine 17 (April 1830) 679.



NORTH. Southey's Colloquies are, in the opinion of young Macaulay, exceedingly contemptible—
SHEPHERD. And wha's young Macaulay?
NORTH. The son of old Macaulay.
SHEPHERD. And wha the deevil's auld Macaulay?
NORTH. Zachary.
SHEPHERD. What? The Sierra Leone saint, who has been the means of sendin' so mony sinners to Satan through that accursed settlement?
NORTH. The same ... But, James, as I was saying, Thomas Macaulay informs his fellow-creatures that Robert Southey's mind is "utterly destitute of the power of discerning truth from falsehood."
SHEPHERD. The Thomas Macaulay is nather mair nor less than an impertinent puppy for his pains; and Maga should lay him across her knee, doun wi' his breeks, and haun' over head wi' the tause on his doup, like Dominie Skelp—