1860 ca. ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Dr. Henry Harington

Walter Savage Landor to John Forster, 1860 ca.; John Forster, Landor, a Biography (1869) 14.



My old tutor at Ashborne, poor dear Langley, had seen Pope when he came to visit Oxford from Lord Harcourt's at Nuneham. Doctor Harrington of Oceana's family dined at [Ralph] Allen's, where he did not meet Pope, but did meet Fielding. Pope, I believe, was then dead. Harrington was almost a boy, fourteen or fifteen years old. He sat at dinner by his father, and Fielding on the other side. Warburton was there, and with great pomposity made a speech eulogistic of Allen, who had said a few words, modest and unimportant. "Gentlemen," said Warburton, "many of us have enjoyed the benefits of a university education, but which among us can speak so wisely and judiciously?" Fielding turned his face round to Harrington and said pretty loudly, "Hark to that sycophantic son of a — of a parson!" I doubt whether the double genitive case was ever so justly (however inelegantly) employed.