1795 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Joseph Warton

Walter Savage Landor, "To Dr. Warton" Poems (1795) 130-32.



WRITTEN ON WARTON'S ESSAY ON POPE.
By Warton's order, Pope behind the screen
Sits hid, and trembles lest he ne'er be seen:
Meanwhile how fast another's numbers flow!
How loud is Aristotle, Bayle, Du Bos!

TO THE MUSE, CONCERNING THE ABOVE EPIGRAM.
If aught of epigram I wrote
Which stuck in Dr. Warton's throat:
Say, Muse! you wish you had forgot it—
Or say, you told the bard to blot it.

Go! go directly: you may say
"Good Doctor, 'tis a charming day."
What? spurn a Briton's first remark?
Well! tell him, then, of K[ett] and C[larke]—
Suppose, his Reverence to appease,
We recollect such lines as these.

TO DR. WARTON.
O hear our suit, good Doctor Warton!
And grant us what we set our heart on.
Forgive us if in dishabille
The plaintive Muse hath seiz'd the quill.
Sit down, good Sir! and we will try
To give the reason, by and by.
E'er since thy brother, our delight!
Left us in anguish and in night,
E'er since that glorious star hath set,
What now remains but C— and K—?
Alas! chaotic is the dark
'Twixt C— and K—, and K— and C—
O! would thy kindness but restore
The precious idols we adore,
No longer then, in Wisdom's spite,
Would loungers read what blockheads write.
Deign from thy brother's works to cull us
What bold Lucretius, sharp Catullus,
Divinely-elegant Tibullus,
—And all the grand Aonian quire—
Would envy, or at least admire.
Then Oxford shall no more regret
The twofold night 'twixt C— and K—