1834 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Robert Southey

Walter Savage Landor, in "To Joseph Ablett" 1834; Works (1846) 2:673.



Ablett, of all the days
My sixty summers ever knew,
Pleasant as there have been no few,
Memory not one surveys
Like those we spent together. Wisely spent
Are they alone that leave the soul content.

Together we have visited the men
Whom Pictish pirates vainly would have drown'd!
Ah, shall we ever clasp the hand again
That gave the British harp its truest sound?
Live, Derwent's guest! and thou by Grasmere springs!
Serene creators of immortal things.

And live too, thou for happier days
Whom Dryden's force and Spenser's fays
Have heart and soul possest:
Growl in grim London he who will,
Revisit thou Maiano's hill,
And swell with pride his sun-burnt breast.