1856 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

William Gifford

Walter Savage Landor, 1856; Forster, Landor, a Biography (1869) 569.



I am reading another volume of Southey's Letters. What an invidious knave it shows Gifford to have been, and how much trouble he took to spoil Southey's reviews! This cobbler cut away so much of leather, The shoe would neither fit nor hold together. His tastes were detestable. He ought to have kept his nose eternally over Juvenal's full cess-pool. Cumberland told me that, one morning when he called on his friend Lord Farnborough, at that time untitled but in office, he found Gifford and another hack in the antechamber. They were admitted to the minister, and soon dismist. He made an apology to Cumberland for detaining him, but said, "These fellows must be attended to." In fact, they came for their pay, and got it.