1795 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Samuel Rogers

Anonymous, "To Samuel Rogers ... on his ordering a short Great Coat called a Spenser" European Magazine 27 (June 1795) 418.



SAM ROGERS, having long possess'd
Old Edmund Spenser's witt,
With garment call'd a Spenser now
He doth himself befitt.

O precious Impe of Fame! Sam Rogers hight!
Who chauntest Memorie in dulcett straine,
Filling our eares and harts with such delight
Entraunc'd we live past pleasaunce o'er againe;
This amplest theme, by other's minc'd in vaine,
Was by the sacred sisters nyne with held
Immortal guerdon for thy browes to gaine.
Certes, old Humber's bard, and he who dwel'd
Whylome in daintie Leasowes, are by thee excell'd!

In amice boldlie then thyself againe
Withouten bases, bearing aye the name
Of him who did on Mulla's banks surprize
The listening worlde with Gloriana's fame!
Ne Lord, ne Ladie, christen'd hath the same,
He soars aloft who did so queintlie sing,
And Lords and Ladies crouchen low with shame
When they unequal competition bring
To Poets — greater farre than Kesar or than King!

And could thilk Kirtle none but Poets weare,
How few sich peerless garment mought invest,
Should it like Florimel's coye belt so rare
Start from unworthie sides, "ungirt, unblest!"
But Spenser's genius is by thee posses'd!
So, as in holie writt yrapt we read
The Prophet's robe did with Elisha rest,
Of cloth, or freeze, as Spenser made with speed,
And to Spenser's high renowne eftsoons succeed.