1767 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

John Hawkesworth

Joseph Cockfield to Weeden Butler, 1 January 1767; in John Nichols, Illustrations of the Literary History of the XVIII Century (1817-58) 5:773-74.



Mr. [John] Hoole (when we spent some time at his house) mentioned in the course of conversation, that he had engaged himself with Dr. Hawkesworth to dine with Dr. [William] Dodd. I am informed the Doctor intends to publish his edition of Telemaque by subscription, and that the book is to be printed in quarto. The Doctor seems to be the only person suited for such an undertaking. In several of his papers in the Adventurer he seems to write like another Fenelon; he possesses the imagination of the Poet, his Essays have all the elegance and harmony of verse; he is often sublime, often serious, never light and trivial, except when he indulges in innocent gaiety, which is rather unfrequent.