1768 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. John Langhorne

Joseph Cockfield to Weeden Butler, 5 December 1768; in John Nichols, Illustrations of the Literary History of the XVIII Century (1817-58) 5:790.



I am concerned to hear of poor Mr. D—'s loss, and sincerely sympathize with him, as I have with two of my friends lately, Messrs. Langhorne and Scott, on these melancholy occasions. The last named gentleman has not resumed his polite and pathetic pen hitherto, but the former has bewailed his loss in an elegant Monody written at Sandgate Castle. I thought to have had an opportunity of seeing him whilst in town, but have been by one disagreeable occurrence or other deprived of that satisfaction. There is a high panegyric on the lady in the papers; and indeed the loss of such persons in these times is a sufficient subject of lamentation.