1808 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Robert Burns

John-Henry Kenney, "Fragment on the Death of Robert Burns" The Burniad; an Epistle to a Lady (1808) 27-28.



An' hast thou bid the warl farewel,
Sweet brither o' the tunefu' shell!
Ah me! I hear the dolefu' knell,
Hark — it returns;
An' is't (waes me!) the passing bell
Of Robert Burns?

Ah welladay! alake, alake!
Sure thy loo'd Jenny's heart maun break,
Are these her moans that, for thy sake,
Sigh on the gale,
As the lorn Zephyrs dool'd to speak
The mournfu' tale?

I list', an' och! methinks I hear
The sad lorn dirges o'er thy bier,
An' down my cheeks fu' monie a tear
In silence steal;
But when a' silent I appear,
The more I feel.

An' now alane, frae night to morn',
In grief I'll raise my rustick horn;
(Mysel like thee a ploughman born)
To mak' my moan;
Thy brither Bardie a' forlorn,
Sin' thou art gone!