1610 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Giles Fletcher

Phineas Fletcher, ["Upon my Brother, Mr. G. F. his Book entituled Christs Victorie and Triumph"] Fletcher, Christs Victorie (1610) sig. 2v.



Fond ladds, that spend so fast your poasting time,
(Too poasting time, that spends your time as fast)
To chaunt light toyes, or frame some wanton rime,
Where idle boyes may glut their lustfull tast,
Or else with praise to cloath some fleshly slime
With virgins roses, and fair lillies chast:
While itching bloods, and youthfull eares adore it,
But wiser men, and once your selves will most abhorre it.

But thou, (most neere, most deare) in this of thine
Ha'st prov'd the Muses not to Venus bound,
Such as thy matter, such thy Muse divine:
Or thou such grace with Merci's selfe hast found,
That she her selfe deign's in thy leaves to shine:
Or stol'n from heav'n, thou broughts this verse to ground,
Which frights the nummed soule with fearefull thunder,
And soone with honied dewes melts it twixt joy, and wonder.

Then doe not thou malitious tongues esteeme,
The glasse, through which an envious eye doth gaze,
Can easily make a molehill mountaines seeme;
His praise dispraises; his dispraises praise.
Enough if best men best thy labours deem,
And to the highest pitch thy merit raise,
While all the Muses to thy song decree
Victorious Triumph, Triumphant Victorie.