1729 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

William Congreve

Anonymous, "On Mr. Congreve" Fog's Weekly Journal (1 February 1729).



On Sunday Night last, the Corpse of William Congreve, Esq; was interr'd in Westminster-Abbey, near the Earl of Godolphin's Monument, from the Jerusalem Chamber, where it lay in State.

ON MR. CONGREVE.
When that the wounded Marble tells
Where Congreve's silent Remnant dwells,
And o'er his sacred Kindred Dust,
The artful Sculptor forms the Bust;
Inscrib'd to him, whose deathless Song
Was smoothly nervous, sweet and strong.
"And is it He?" The Standers by
Astonish'd, with Surprize will cry,
"Can so much Wit and Learning dye?"
Should any Stranger be so near,
As Congreve's happy Name to hear,
He'll surely ask "What great Reward,
Our learned Albion gave the Bard?"
"Why Congreve had, — What had He? — Praise,
Shadwell and Eusden wore the Bays."