1750 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Thomas Gibbons

Moses Browne, "To the Rev. Mr. Thomas Gibbons, on reading some abusive Verses to him" Gentleman's Magazine 20 (November 1750) 517.



Blush not, sweet poet! if thy piece
Meets a like fate with his of Greece,
By Envy's bands invaded;
Stamp'd, on the bullion of thy lines,
Genius, with strong impression, shines
More mark'd, the more degraded.

Of merit 'tis the gen'ral fate,
All that was ever good, or great,
Mean souls delight to sully:
Seek we the crowd to shun? My friend!
Laurels can't Young from dirt defend,
Nor eloquence a Tully.

The owl will hoot, that cannot sing;
Spite would displume the Muses' wing,
Tho' Phoebus self applaud her:
Still Homer bleeds in Zoilus' page,
A Virgil scap'd not Maevius' rage,
And Milton has his Lauder.