1705 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Sir Philip Sidney

Sir Richard Blackmore, in Eliza, an Epick Poem (1705) 89.



These ardent Squadrons were by Sidney led,
(Who has not Sidney's Praises heard or read?)
Whose Pen and Sword both Laurels did acquire,
Whom Camps and Courts did equally admire.
None more did famous Men of Letters court,
None their Polite Republick more support.
He, their Protector, cherish'd every Bard,
And all their Flights profusely did reward.
The tuneful Tribe his Triumphs did adorn,
And at his Altars all their Incense burn.
None in the Poets Songs more brightly shone,
Immortal by their Pens, Immortal by his own.
All to his Standard Veneration paid,
Brought to his Mint their Works to be essay'd.
No Poet's then were reckon'd Sterling Lays,
Which bore no Stamp or Mark of Sidney's Praise.
Ye Bards, this noble Patron would you know?
Sidney was then, what Montague is now.