1745 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Lord Chesterfield

Anonymous, "On seeing a Picture of Lord Chesterfield" St. James's Evening Post (21 December 1745).



How weak is all the nicest Painter's Art!
How faithless to the Dictates of his Heart!
The piercing Eye; the Dignity of Face;
The mingled Majesty of Awe and Grace;
These thou may'st copy: But tho' all agree
These are of STANHOPE, yet they are not He.

How then shall Colours a Resemblance find!
Or where's the Pencil that can paint his Mind!
Unblemish'd Worth! Truth dauntless and sincere!
The Patriot's Vigour! and the Statesman's Care!
Wisdom by Fancy's Aid inspir'd to please!
And Roman Eloquence with Attick Ease!

Canst thou paint Silence? when Attention hung
With Wonder held by his perswasive Tongue?
The Manly Sense when melting Senates bless'd,
And Wit's strong Charms in gay good-nature drest?

Or draw his honest undissembling Smile
Spread, by his Presence, o'er Hibernia's Isle:
Then shall her Sons to latest Times declare
Taught by the well-known Likeness, STANHOPE'S there.