1736 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

John Dryden

T. C., "Upon seeing a new Bust, in the room of a former one, on Mr. Dryden's Monument in Westminster-Abbey" Grub-Street Journal (27 May 1736).



Ingenious Sculptor, in this just design,
Thy art beyond dispute is prov'd divine,
DRYDEN restor'd, survives in every line.
And, if a tribute to a glorious name,
In Honour's temple can deserve a claim;
His fame, whose bounty did thy pains reward,
A rank shall challenge second to the Bard.

One thing, fair Artist, (whether 'twas thy thought,
Or his, who thy judicious labours bought)
I much admire: That now no laurels grow,
As heretofore, around the Poet's brow;
For, who'd wish DRYDEN'S sacred temples bound,
Where SHADWELL'S are, and CIBBER'S may be crown'd?