1791 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Dr. Henry Harington

Dr. John Wolcot, "On seeing a recent musical Performance by Dr. Harrington, of Bath" Morning Chronicle (19 March 1791).



When people borrow, it should be their care
To send things back again — it is but fair:
To gratitude and manners this is due.
Therefore, good Doctor, to the God of Song
Return his Lyre — you've really had it long;
Others must be oblig'd, as well as you.

THE RETORT CURTEOUS; OR INNOCENCE DEFENDED.
BY DR. HARRINGTON, TO PETER PINDAR, ESQ.
A Lyre, indeed! he borrowd no such thing,
But sports a stick, with bladders and a string;
—A lousy Hedge-Nymph's hurdy gurd;
Skulking about from door to door,
Squalls beggars' ballads by the score,
But not a penny gets — as ever yet was heard.
'Twas thieving PINDAR — 'tis well known,
Swindled his Godship's old Cremone;
But so vamp'd up — he scruples not to shew it;
For what with varnish, sound-post, silver string—
'Tis so improv'd — he plays before the KING,
In tone so sweet — his Godship does not know it.

ON READING A LITERARY PRODUCTION OF DR. HARRINGTON'S.
BY PETER PINDAR.
Doctor, I much your principles admire—
APOLLO very kindly lent his Lyre;
And you, the most refin'd of grateful men,
To quit the obligation — stole his Pen.