1757 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Henry More

Richard Hurd, in Letter to Mr. Mason on the Marks of Imitation (1757) 21-22.



There is no wonder, now one sees the fountain Milton drew from, that, in admiration of this poetical philosophy (which nourish'd the fine spirits of that time, tho' it corrupted some) he should make the other speaker in the Scene cry out, as in a fit of extasy,

How charming is divine philosophy!
Not harsh, and crabbed, as dull fools suppose,
But musical as in Apollo's lute,
And a perpetual feast of nectar'd sweets,
Where no crude surfeit reigns—

The very ideas which Lord SHAFTESBURY has employed in his encomiums on the Platonic philosophy; and the very language which Dr. HENRY MORE would have us'd if he had know to express himself so soberly.