1728 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

William Browne of Tavistock

Anonymous, in Memoir of William Pattison; Works (1728) 12.



But here I must digress (tho' it will greatly tend to the Reader's Entertainment) in giving some Account of the Raptures Mr. Pattison was in, upon reading the Poetical Works of Mr. William Browne, an imperfect copy of which he had purchased for a Shilling, and which, thro' his Misfortunes, was the whole Library he left behind him. From some Instances which I shall produce, it will, I doubt not, appear even to our most infallible Criticks, that, tho' Mr. Browne wrote an hundred and eleven Years ago, his Language is as nervous, his Numbers as harmonious, his Descriptions as natural, his Panegyrick as soft, and his Satire as pointed, as any that are to be found in the Whip-syllibub Poetasters of the present Century.