1792 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Edmund Burke

J. S., "Burke and Paine" Bath Register (5 May 1792).



The Orator BURKE has publish'd a work,
Some say 'twas Court favour to gain;
But all his fine diction won't keep off affliction,
For still he's tormented with PAINE.

The theme which Burke writes, it that Man hath no Rights;
A subject for Courtiers well suited:
But by Paine's brief decisions, part of Burke's lame positions
Are fairly and clearly confuted.

Was Burke to advance his queer doctrine in Fance,
And try with fine words to convert them,
They'd say, with a smile, "Preach to your own isle—
We have Rights, and will boldly assert them."

The book Paine has wrote is worthy of note;
But after due consideration,
His Democrat schemes, if push'd to extremes,
With broils would inflame the whole nation.

These two party writers being tumult exciters,
We hope a new work will be seen,
From some moderate man, who is no partizan,
To point out the true golden mean.

By all men 'tis granted, Reformation is wanted,
Corruption has had a long run;
Then let luxury cease, and you'll frankly confess
That part of the work will be done.

Let our great men above but oeconomists prove,
And taxes will quickly decrease;
The nation will flourish, and in every parish
Will be merriments, plenty, and peace.
Salisbury, May 2, 1792.