1773 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

George Lyttelton

Anonymous, "On the Death of Lord Lyttelton" Newcastle Chronicle (11 September 1773).



Peace to thy shade — no more shall mortal care
Or worldly strife depress thy better part;
No more shall grief with ghastly visage stare,
Nor filial disobedience wring thy heart.

Thy heart — where glow'd in one united flame
The patriot's ardour and the poet's fire;
The same thy judgement, and thy skill the same,
To sway the scepter or to wake the lyre.

To happier seats thy spirit free shall roam,
(Seats which alone thine Hagley can excel)
There kindred shades shall lead thee to thy dome,
Where heroes crown'd with glory ever dwell.

But chiefly they, whose vindicated name,
Or love rewarded, bids them mindful prove:
Here grateful Henry points the road to fame,
And here again shall Lucy join her love.

Blest pair! no more to part, but still enjoy
Celestial rapture and eternal youth.—
Thus does the Muse her slender aid employ,
To deck the urn of piety and truth.
Newcastle.