1792 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Edmund Burke

Pindaricus, in "An Ode for the New Year, 1792" Newcastle Chronicle (14 January 1792).



Against the nobles' Turkish claim,
From age to age the tyrant's claim,
To rob the peasant's nest;
To squeeze the blood from all his veins,
The hard-earn'd remnant of his gains,
And let him die distress'd!

Can Tully's heart, obdurate still,
With even an enemy so ill,
As thus to be undone!
Again to feel the storms of woe,
Which France, no longer now our foe,
Felt — conquer'd all by one!

O B—! from whom the tears of Nature start,
With Indian wrongs around thy heart,
What evil genius drove
Thy patriot soul to Poland warm,
The God of Nature's works to storm,
And fight against his love!

Let his kind rays, whose solar beam
Melts by degrees the frozen stream,
Thy wonted fires recal!
Thaw the clear current of thy blood,
And animate the purple flood
To feel alike for all!