1765 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. James Scott

Anonymous, in "A New Ballad; entituled, A Letter from a Newmarket Jockey to his Brother at York" London Evening Post (27 August 1765).



Brother Harry, I send you most terrible News,
Of strange horrid crimes they poor Jockies accuse;
To our grief, I must tell you, this doctrine's laid down
By Anti-Sejanus and good Doctor ["Estimate"] B—:
That however sensible, noble, or great,
Attach'd to his King, and the good of the State,
A man should be branded with shame and disgrace,
If he ever was known to be at a Horse Race,
Fal-la-ra.

By all manner of ways an estate to increase,
And, to save paying taxes, to patch up a peace;
To keep workmen from work, and their children from bread,
You might think would endanger your life, or your head;
Yet in this there's no harm, 'tis a doctrine laid down
By Anti-Sejanus and good Doctor B—:
But it's factious, licentious, it's shame and disgrace,
As you ought be drubb'd if you're at a Horse-Race.

To lie with another man's wife there's no hurt,
Provided you're decent, and keep on your shirt:
To give her next morn, if she pleases you well,
As a present, a place or employment to sell,
Is virtuous, honest, and doctrine laid down
By Anti-Sejanus and good Doctor B—:
But it's infamous, wicked, it's shame and disgrace,
If ever you're known to be at a Horse Race....

Should you start forth like CUMBERLAND, active and brave,
From a horrid Rebellion, the nation to save;
Should you be what a Nobleman always should be,
Like GRAFTON and ROCKINGHAM, gen'rous and free;
It will signify nought; for the doctrine laid down
By Anti-Sejanus and good Doctor B—,
Is, You ought to branded with shame and disgrace,
If ever you're known to promote a Horse Race.

But, lest you should think my epistle too long,
I'll tell you my mind, and so finish my song:
I believe, by my soul, that, what vexes them most,
Is, that they have got the wrong side of the Post;
And, spite of the maxims and doctrine laid down,
By Anti-Sejanus and good Doctor B—,
I'll be whipp'd if, again might they get into place,
They wou'd not turn Jockies, and ride a Horse Race.