1765 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. James Scott

Philo-Scottus, "A Psalm of David" Gazetteer and New Daily Advertiser (7 November 1765).



I am greatly surprised to see the many invectives that are thrown out against the reverend supposed author of Anti-Sejanus, and must agree with Vindex that he is a most wise, most learned, most pious, most disinterested, and most poetical gentleman. As a proof of which, I shall send you a translation of a celebrated psalm of David into English metre, said to be the production of that Reverend Gentleman. It will be needless in me to point out the many beauties therein, and his prophetic spirit of what he hopes to arrive to: all I shall say is, that if he will oblige the world with a translation of the whole book, in the same elegant manner, of which the following is a specimen, then not only Sternhold and Hopkins, but even Tate and Brady, and also Smart himself, will be deemed mere trifles, and S—'s version will be sung in all polite and political congregations. I will no longer detain your readers from the exquisite pleasure they doubtless expect, but give them the psalm, and remain, yours,
PHILO-SCOTTUS.

A TRANSLATION, INTO ENGLISH METRE.
I.
The Lord of S—d—h guideth me,
And maketh me to lie,
With promises he feedeth me,
For writing vigorously.

II.
That virtuous Lord is on my side;
Why should I be dismay'd?
Since he vouchsafes to be my guide
I trust he'll see me paid.

III.
Joy to my heart he hath restor'd,
For me he hope doth make
That I shall soon be made a Lord,
E'en for his Lordship's sake.

IV.
Tho' the younger Ministry do frown,
Yet will I fear no ill,
For he and I will write them down,
And he'll protect me still.

V.
For me he shall a table spread
When to his house I go;
Upon in plenty shall be laid,
And wine about it flow.

VI.
A M—t—e too within few years,
Shall be secur'd to me;
And evermore the — of —
My loit'ring place shall be.