1791 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

William Woty

Anonymous, "William Wotty" Morning Chronicle (21 March 1791).



Among the eccentricities of this whimsical Parson, some of which deserved more attention than they received, was a little poem entitled The Estate Orators. It was a well pointed ridicule on Auctioneers; but the title led the world to consider it as political, and it was little noticed. Another of his poetical effusions very whimsically burlesques Lord CHESTERFIELD'S system of Education; and about five or six years since he published at Derby a Poetical Epistle to Doctor GRAHAM, with the Motto, "Valeat Res ludicra!"

He wasted all the early part of his life in an attendance upon the family of Ferrers, by them he was promised a living, and influenced by that promise, he took orders. The incumbent of the living he was to have, survived his patron, and I believe he has survived the Poet, though he must now be near a hundred years of age. A few years since WOTTY married, got a trifling living at Loughborough, in Leicestershire, where, afflicted with the gout, and cut off from his early connections, he has "unuzzed" away the latter years of his life.