1793 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Edmund Burke

Anonymous, "The Swinish Multitude to Edmund Burke" Morning Chronicle (4 July 1793).



Be pleased, great Sir, to find us work.

We make no insolent pretensions
To feast on sinecures and pensions;
We know our food must be the getting
Of our own labour, pains and sweating;
'Twas so, they say, in ages past,
And must be so while time shall last.
But Sir, tho' this is fit and meet,
We cannot quite forget to eat,
Nor miss our usual grains and water,
Without just asking, What's the matter?
You told us, and we hoped it true,
With folks above we'd nought to do.
We've not to do, 'tis mighty plain,
With any thing our betters gain;
But when they meet with checks and crosses,
We find a partnership of losses,
And must be scoched in work and wages,
Because crusading all the rage is.

Now this we think not quite the thing,
So please to hint it to the —.