1799 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

George Chalmers

Anonymous, "Epigrams (continued) on the Heavy Supplemental Apology" Morning Chronicle (23 September 1799).



EPIGRAM VII.
A LIBITINAL EPIGRAM.
(Signed in the original M.S. T. JARVIS, Patent Coffin Maker, opposite the King on the Black Horse, Charing Cross. JASP. H.)

When DYER gave the world his FLEECE,
He soon grew wond'rous sullen,
For every Wit pronounc'd, his Muse
Would buried lie in wollen.

Oh, had poor DYER yet surviv'd,
CHALMERS had made him proud,
And o'er the Bard and Sheep had thrown
His Supplemental Shrowd.

Lin'd with his book's metallic leaves,
What could disturb the dead?
Secure, when all without was Wool,
And all within was Lead.

EPIGRAM VIII.
(The original M.S. is signed in a very gentlemanly handwriting, STEPHEN COTTRELL, Kt. Master of the Ceremonies, &c. &c. JASP. H.)

"Laws without manners* are but vain,"
The Swan of Tiber sung;
And from Verusium to Blackheath
The polish'd echo rung.

"Laws, manners, graces, what are they,
Or all that HORACE saith?"
Cries GEORGE; since Ireland boasts, I stand
Defender of the Faith!

* "Manners," in the plural, signifies "studied civility." — Johnson's Dictionary. But Mr. CHALMERS always uses it in the singular throughout the whole Supplemental Apology. JASP. H.

EPIGRAM IX.
A VIRTUOUS EPIGRAM.
Recommended to every Bachelor in the Kingdom; occasioned by reading the following affectionate aphorism by GEORGE CHALMERS, A S S, in two parts, the second of which is beautifully ambiguous, viz. "Men usually make love to women; and woo them to wed." Supplemental Apology, page 96.
(N.B. The M.S. in the original is signed GEORGE COLMAN the Younger. JASPER H.)

GEORGE to the critic camp repairs,
And turns poetic suttler,
Then "reasons" on the bills he brings
From Gilbert, Locke, and Butler.

Queen Bess he calls a buxom maid,
Next "proves" it by a sonnet,
That SHAKESPEARE threw the handkerchief,
And she look'd sweetly on it.

But since "to women men make love,
And woo them (for*) to wed;"
BESS would have chang'd WILL'S mulb'rry rod
For GEORGE'S Mace of Lead.

* Grammar, sense, and the harmony of this verse require the insertion of this "causal" or "conjugal" article. JASP. H., from the Grammatical Canons of GEORGE CHALMERS.
(A TRUE COPY. From the Originals preserved in Mr. OWEN, JUNIOR'S, Chambers in the Inner Temple.) (L.S.)
JASPER HARGRAVE,
Clerk to Mr. OWEN, JUNIOR.

(To be continued.)