1787 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

George Colman

Anti-Nimrod, "To George Colman, on the daily and illiberal Abuse thrown out against him in a Morning Paper called The World" Morning Chronicle and London Advertiser (25 August 1787).



Thou actest wisely, little Col,
To let the clumsey rouged man-doll
His erring arrows fling;
A contest hints an equal cause,
And who could use the rod or laws
On such a naked thing?

But who is he that dares assail?
Why view his head, observe his tail,
Then say where shall he class?
Is it a woman, man, or both,
Of foreign or domestic growth,
Or is it all an ass?

And then for whom this muck and gall?
For one they Madam Cowslip call,
Who drawls what she should utter;
Who "for us and our tragedy,"
Would force from you a small supply
For summer's bread and butter.

Thus two objects justify
Your looking with a careless eye
O'er every shaft that's hurl'd;
Let Horace wisely then advise,
"Arm'd in your innocence, despise
A senseless, slanderous WORLD."