1785 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Thomas Chatterton

Mary Robinson, in "The Poet. A Fragment" Morning Post and Daily Advertiser (11 October 1785).



With eager raptures Plenty I embrac'd,
But bliss is fleeting — joy will die away—
'Twas but a vision and delusive form
That seldom long will own the POET'S sway.

Banish'd by gods and men, Vacuna came,
And oft, by smiles, obtain'd my fond esteem;
Lost in the labyrinth of dull despair,
And sinking oft in Poverty's deep stream.

The Muse's vot'ry meets the frown of Scorn,
'Tis Plutus must preside to gain a name!
Penury, e'en made CHATTERTON her own,
Tho' daily rising in the rank of Fame.

A POET'S life is one long storm of cares,
Which lasts existence, then he's thrown on shore:—
The sea is calm, and Fame resplendent shines,
The sun breaks forth, alas! when HE'S NO MORE.