1789 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Robert Merry

Rosalia, "To Della Crusca" Morning Post and Daily Advertiser (24 November 1789).



Oh! sweetest Bard, whose raptur'd lyre,
The Muses and the Loves inspire,
Once more resume thy melting song,
And charm the willing world along.

Whether we rove the gloomy shade,
And see the balmy blossoms fade,
As HORROR drives with frantic force,
And withering marks his baleful course.

Or pausing on the martial plain,
O'er sacred mould of heroes slain,
We meditate with whelming grief,
On poison of the laurel leaf.

Or whether thy sublimer string
Strike to the dread TERRIFIC KING,
Who mortals dooms to realms unknown,
To bend before his shadowy throne.

Or seeking haunts of softer pow'r,
The lucid fount, the myrtle bow'r,
The breezy hill, the hermit cave,
The streams where all the Muses lave;

For where, dear Minstrel, thou art seen,
The meads put forth a tend'rer green,
The rills in sweeter murmurs run,
The skies present a richer sun.

Lo! FAME, her fairest wreaths assigns,
While LOVE delighted chaunts thy lines,
Oh then resume thy melting song,
And charm the willing world along.