1797 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Edmund Burke

Anonymous, "Fox and Burke; or, the Shooters" Morning Post and Fashionable World (20 April 1797).



BURKE, charg'd with eloquence and wit,
When sallying forth, quite scares us!
Our FEARS he's sure to spring and hit,
And warms our spleen and a—.

FOX, tho' BURKE'S Pupil once forsooth,
Acts quite a diff'rent part;
He loads with argument and truth,
And hits the head and heart.

FOX, for his Wadding, boldly rams
The BRITISH CONSTITUTION;
BURKE down his rifl'd barrel crams
The GALLIC REVOLUTION.

Which of the Statesmen fires the louder,
Would you dispute at all?
Know — more than FOX, BURKE uses Powder,
But never uses — Ball.

Thus have I seen two brother Cits
Go shooting — out of TOWN,
One squanders, tho' he never hits,
The other — brings 'em down.

For why? The one a Cockney bred,
Had only powder got,
The other knew the use of lead,
And charg'd his piece — with shot.