1772 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Lord Chesterfield

Soame Jenyns, "On the Earl of Chesterfield being at Bath" St. James's Chronicle (18 July 1772).



Bath, July 12, 1772.
The following elegant Verses have been lately handed about here as the Production of Mr. Soame Jenning's elegant Pen.

In Times by Selfishness and Faction sour'd,
When dull Importance has all Wit devour'd;
When Rank, as if t' insult alone design'd,
Exacts a proud Seclusion from Mankind;
And Greatness from all social Commerce fled,
Esteems it Dignity, to be ill-bred.
See Chesterfield alone resists the Tide,
Above all Party, and above all Pride!
Vouchsafes each Night these brilliant Scenes to grace,
Augments, and shares the Pleasures of the Place;
Admires the Fair, enjoys the sprightly Ball,
Deigns to be pleas'd, and therefore pleases all.
Hence, tho' unequal now the Task to hit,
Learn what was once Politeness, Ease, and Wit.