1764 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Joseph Spence

James Woodhouse, in "The Lessowes, a Poem" Poems on Sundry Occasions (1764) 66-67.



Beside the lake a clump of trees extend
Their length'ning arms, and o'er the waters bend,
A mighty shade, of oak and beech compos'd,
While in the midst a regal tree inclos'd,
With pride supports the honour'd name of SPENCE,
Bright son of learning, candour, wit, and sense!
Who, tho' he bears the critic's awful name,
Vouchsafes to all their rightful share of fame;
Tho' pride or dulness ne'er obtain his praise,
He deigns to smile on meritorious lays;
And Crispin's numbers are to him as dear
As equal merit in a prince or peer.
His gentle mind can relish more delight
In placing beauties in the fairest light,
Than planting blemishes in odious hue,
Glaring and obvious to dark envy's view.