1764 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Richard Graves

James Woodhouse, in "The Lessowes, a Poem" Poems on Sundry Occasions (1764) 98-99.



Here Scotch and silver firs, the shrubs among,
And lovely larch with hairy verdure hung,
And sycamores their lofty summits rear,
And silver-border'd foliage hollies wear;
While these above, with various others, twine,
Beneath, the piony and catch-fly shine;
Narcissus fair, and early daffodil,
Between their stems the vacant spaces fill.
Across the center, o'er a pebbly way,
From latent fountain, limpid waters play;
Where, from a terrace grac'd with IAGO'S name,
Who oft has felt the muse's thrilling flame,
A painted seat appears, in green array'd,
A prospect yielding o'er a lovely glade:
The batter'd priory crowns its further side,
Beyond, hills, lakes, and buildings scatter'd wide:
While, half-conceal'd behind the thick-wrought leaves,
Another seat supports the name of GRAVES,
GRAVES, gentlest bard of Acmancesta's plain,
Whose mind's as gen'rous as his heart's humane.