1798 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

James Pettit Andrews

Anonymous, "The Tears of Friendship: an Elegy on the Death of James Pettit Andrews, Esq." Whitehall Evening Post (30 January 1798).



Hark! what shrill note of woe assails my ear?
What footsteps echo from the fatal bier?
Why pants my heart with tremulous beat of Death?
Why strives oppressed for utterance my breath?

Alas! too soon the poignant cause is known,
A friend rever'd, and not by me alone,
Has traced on earth his all respected way,
And risen, why mourn I then? to realms of day.

Blest be his generous soul! which oft has spread
Such genial influence o'er the orphan's head;
Has cheered the thrilling agony of grief,
And opened wide his hand to give relief.

The man is gone! the mortal part adieu!
His outward form no more shall glad my view;
But ah! not so his shade, 'tis present here,
And gladly lists our heartfelt praise to hear.

Rest, rest in peaceful joy! and hovering near
Protect, and watch our steps for evermore;
Until we join thee in the spangled sky,
Whence fears and dangers far from us shall fly.